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Literacy - More Than Reading and Writing

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Literacy is more than learning to read and write. Becoming literate also incorporates the development of essential language, cognitive, social and emotional skills as children interact and explore the world around them.

Written by: Bellbird  

Developing Emergent Literacy Skills 

 

 

Literacy is more than learning to read and write.

Becoming literate also incorporates the development of essential language, cognitive, social and emotional skills as children interact and explore the world around them.

Reading books with children is a very important first interaction, as much as singing Nursery rhymes or pointing out letters, colours and numbers during a walk around the neighbourhood.

Experiences like this encourage language development and social skills such as listening, understanding information and turn taking.

Books can be the base for helping children to understand concepts that can be incorporated by pairing books with play spaces.

Much loved titles such as Who Sank The Boat? by Pamela Allen can be followed by setting up water play experiences that are focused floating and sinking activities with the characters from the story.

Wombat Stew by Marcia Vaughan, can lead to pretend cooking experiences in a sand pit, sensory table top activity including wombat, dingo echidna characters or mixing stew in a mud kitchen

Setting up play spaces invite further opportunities for children to remember what they have heard and re-tell the story to themselves or with others, which is one of the critical elements of developing emergent literacy skills.

Through this type of imaginative play they also learn that stories have a beginning, middle and end.

Children love to re-read favourite books. It makes them feel part of the reading experience, and encourages them to discover the power of communication through imagination.

Books that rhyme, have a rhythm and feature repetition support children to be able to recall the story. Children’s author Linley Dodd, who wrote the Hairy Maclary, is a famous for this as most children know of her much loved animal characters, such as 'Bottomley Potts' the Dalmation all 'covered in spots' or 'Hercules Morse' the Great Dane who is as 'big as a horse!'

The rhythm of the story engages children, the familiar predictable text supports them to remember the words as they join in the reading. The exciting and suspenseful conclusion which children can anticipate is part of the love of reading and literacy as stories build each page.

Adding other props such as hand or finger puppets  can enrich these experiences further, often leading to children creating their own versions of stories or additional characters.

 
 

 

Board Books

 Big Books

Book Sets

Visual Reality Books

Books with Felt Toys

Educator Resource Books

 

 

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